Stamp Tax

The Stamp Act of 1765 was largely responsible for enabling the American Revolution, as we all know. However, for those of us that can after the 50s, it may be shocking to learn that the United States used revenue stamps for various services through 1958. Documentary stamps were the most common of these stamps and were often used to pay notary and sale fees for land sales. Below you can see $39.60 in documentary stamps to complete a sale between A.G. Becker and W.T. Pulliam for the conveyance of an 80-acre tract out of the Memory Gardens of Corpus Christi…. Read more »


Tragedy on the Bay

Few people remember the Alta Vista Hotel in Corpus Christi. Its story is one of failed dreams and overlooked potential. The hotel was built by Colonel Elihu Harrison Ropes in the late Nineteenth Century. Ropes, who eventually had the street located between Sinclair & Doddridge dedicated in his honor, came to Corpus with hopes of molding a new economic hub out of the city on the bay. Unfortunately, his financial bakers from the East Coast pulled out only a few years into Ropes transformation and his dreams retreated with them. Defeated, Ropes left Corpus. This didn’t stop the construction of… Read more »


Where’s Doddridge?

Those that know Corpus Christi history know that many of our streets are named after the movers and shakers of the city’s past. Perry Doddridge, the man that opened the first bank in Corpus Christi, unsurprisingly has a street named after him as well. Living up to Perry Doddridge’s reputation for changing capitalistic ventures, so does the street. Doddridge was originally built as part of a beach front addition to the city. The area was home to the Memorial Coliseum before it was demolished in 2010. It is unknown if the street was renamed Kinney to specifically honor the founder of… Read more »


Spatial Fascination

Maps. Chances are if you’re on this site, you have some form of love for maps. Maps are these beautiful spatial interpretations that connect peoples and cultures alike. Whether it’s a geopolitical conversion of countries into perceived animals or a pocket map often found in the real-estate classifieds, maps have connected us one way or another. French & Haberer was a civil engineering firm in the Nueces County area in the early 1900’s that produced many of the maps and plats used by real-estate companies to advertise the beautiful cities and towns of South Texas. The French & Haberer Handy Pocket… Read more »


Give me a break

No matter what your profession is, every now and again we all just need a break. Back in 1924 surveyors weren’t able to escape reality by checking their Facebook notifications or calling friends or family on their cellphones. Instead, they created game boards on the backs of their preliminary plats! This simple pleasure serves as both a reminder of simpler times and a continued connection to humans across the ages. My only question to Mr. Blucher would be; what’d the client say when you turned in a plat with a chess board painted on the back?